Painting 101: Art Influences For Beginners



If you're new to painting or just looking for some inspiration, you've come to the right place. In this article, we'll explore some of the most influential paintings in history and how they can inspire your own work.

One of the most influential paintings of all time is the Mona Lisa, painted by Leonardo da Vinci in the early 16th century. This painting is famous for its enigmatic smile and its unique composition. When looking at the Mona Lisa, take note of the way the subject is placed in the center of the painting with a strong horizontal line running across the background. This placement creates a sense of balance and stability in the painting. You can use this technique in your own work by placing the subject of your painting in the center and using horizontal lines in the background to create a sense of balance.

The next painting on our list is The Starry Night, painted by Vincent van Gogh in 1889. This painting is full of intense emotion and is one of the most recognizable paintings in the world. When looking at The Starry Night, pay attention to the way van Gogh used color to convey emotion. The intense blues and greens create a sense of calm, while the yellow stars seem to pop off the canvas. You can use color to create emotion in your own paintings by choosing colors that contrast with each other. For example, you could use a bright color like yellow to convey happiness or a calm color like blue to convey serenity.

Last on our list is The Scream, painted by Edvard Munch in 1893. This painting is full of angst and terror, and is one of the most famous paintings in the world. When looking at The Scream, take note of the way Munch used distorted lines and shapes to create a sense of unease. You can use distorted lines and shapes in your own paintings to create a sense of movement or to convey a particular emotion.

These are just a few of the most influential paintings in history. Take some time to study these paintings and see how you can incorporate their techniques into your own work.

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